IPv4-IPv6 Transition Technology Interop at IETF 100 Hackathon in Singapore

IETF 100 Hackathon wrapped up several weeks ago in steamy Singapore. Over two hundred participants spent the weekend on November 11th – 12th discussing, collaborating and developing sample code, solutions and ideas that show practical implementations of IETF standards.

IETF 100 Hackathon, Singapore

If you have never seen this YouTube video on IPv6, you really should.

It goes on between two characters, one of whom is an IPv6 proponent while the other one really admires NATs: and that was our team. We wanted to test if the “new” Internet would run on IPv6 plus NAT64, or whether we can keep the “old” Internet working forever through the IPv4 address sharing mechanisms.

The room started to fill quickly after the doors opened. We displayed a poster that introduced the project and after a brief kick-off presentation got to work. Our table, full of power outlets, switches, gateways, routers and patch cables, attracted the most interest among the hackathon participants.

The hackathon was the first opportunity for interop testing of VPP DS-Lite AFTR as well as NAT64 and LW46. We also spent the weekend implementing the VPP DHCPv6 PD client, Stun library DNS64 NAT64 discovery / IPv4 literal synthesizer. We also tried testing applications behind DS-Lite, 464 XLAT and NAT64.

We’ve made a few interesting findings. On the iPhone, the ecosystem of which is forcing IPv6 only support, almost everything works; on the laptop, most stuff works. We learned that building these networks is very hard! I mean, we thought IPv6 should just be plug and play. These IPv6 addresses are long to type and synthesizing IPv6 address from NAT64 prefixes was a poor idea, but at least we fixed a buffer overflow bug. Media still works point-to-point, even behind multiple NATs.

We think the future should really be IPv6 plus NAT64, but this puts new requirements on IPv6 hosts. They need to be able to do NAT64 prefix discovery, synthesize IPv6 address from IPv4 literal and have to support local DNS64.

Our work continued on Sunday until 2pm when we stop doing whatever we were doing and the sharing of results begins. Presentation, no longer than 3 minutes, recapping results, lessons learned and recommendations. The video from presentations and awards is available on YouTube.

IPv6-IPv4 transition technology interop presentation is available here and NAT64 testing here.

My team won the “Best Input for the Scotch BoF to the universal deployment of IPv6” award.

 

Matúš Fabian

YANG Catalog: Making models work together

With YANG establishing itself as the standard modeling language of choice, the industry hit a speed bump. Although the entire industry develops YANG models, we lack a way to ensure they will work together in order for operators to automate coherent services.

The problem was, as the IETF blog elaborates, tackled at Internet Engineering Task Force’s IETF 98 Hackathon by a group of ten-ish enthusiasts, including Pantheon Technologies’ Miroslav Kováč, via integrating tools around a YANG catalog.

The idea behind the catalog is to become a reference for all available YANG modules, serving both the YANG developers as well as operators. The catalog should also provide metadata on YANG models, offering information on module implementation, availability of open-source code and possibly much more.

Compared to a Github repository, added value of the YANG catalog resides in the toolchain and the additional metadata, more about which you’ll find in the IETF article.

Martin Firák

Sysrepo at IETF 96 Hackathon in Berlin

Sysrepo, an open source project developed by several partners including Pantheon Technologies, participated at the IETF 96 Hackathon in Berlin, held from July 16th to July 17th, 2016.

The IETF Hackathon is all about promoting the collaborative spirit of open source development and integrating it into IETF standards. The Sysrepo project provides a framework that can be used to bring NETCONF & YANG management to any existing or new Unix/Linux application, which should help spreading these IETF standards into the wider open source community.

The hackathon was our first opportunity to introduce the Sysrepo project to the audience experienced with NETCONF & YANG standards. In front of our poster (see below), we led many constructive discussions with other participants and have gained lots of feedback.

ietf96-hackathon-posterApart from presenting the project to other participants of the IETF meeting, we spent the weekend by hacking on three sub-projects based on Sysrepo:

NETCONF/YANG management of Raspberry Pi

To demonstrate that NETCONF & YANG are also applicable in the IoT (Internet of Things) domain, as well as to demonstrate that Sysrepo can work also on systems with limited resources, we prepared a simple Sysrepo plugin that can control GPIO pins of the Raspberry Pi. We’ve demonstrated this on a relay switch and a thermal sensor connected to the GPIO of the Pi running on Raspbian Linux with Sysrepo and Netopeer2 – we were able to turn the relay on or off via NETCONF, or retrieve the current temperature gained from the sensor via NETCONF.

sysrepo-raspberry

Sysrepo plugin for the ietf-system YANG module

Another part of the team formed out of the hackathon participants focused on development of a Sysrepo plugin that implements the ietf-system YANG module on a generic Linux host. During the hackathon, they managed to write the code that allows NETCONF management of the host name, clock & timezone settings, and is capable of restarting and shutting down device via NETCONF RPCs.

NETCONF/YANG management of DHCPv6 in ISC Kea

The developers of the ISC Kea DHCP server joined our team with a clear goal: enable NETCONF/YANG management of their DHCP daemon using Sysrepo and Netopeer2. During the hackathon they wrote a Sysrepo plug-in for ISC Kea that is able to manage some part of Kea’s configuration via NETCONF. Their work hasn’t stopped after the hackathon ended – they expressed an interest to continue in this direction in the future too.

After the hacking ended, each team prepared a short presentation of their achievements. These were streamed online and are available on YouTube:

Although the biggest achievement for us was the high interest in the Sysrepo project among the IETF meeting participants, and all the feedback we gained from them, we were also selected as a winner in the „Most Importance to IETF“ category. You can read more about that in this blog post.

Rastislav Szabo

                                                                                 Software Engineer in Pantheon Technologies

More information on Sysrepo:

Project page: http://www.sysrepo.org/

GitHub: https://github.com/sysrepo/sysrepo

Mailing lists: http://lists.sysrepo.org/listinfo/

https://www.isc.org/blogs/ietf-hackathon-in-berlin-kea-and-yangnetconf/